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Banned Books Week review of:

THE GIVER

by Lois Lowry

Author’s Website: http://www.loislowry.com/books.html

 

Winning the Newbery Award is like the YA Fiction equivalent to the Nobel Peace Prize, so books that do win have to be deserving of the attention they receive. One overwhelmingly worthy book of this description is The Giver, by Lois Lowry. When I recommend this book to people in passing, I sometimes jokingly refer to it as “dystopian literature for kids”, but if I’m being honest with myself, such an epithet truly does not do it justice. Yes, it does bear some resemblance to Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World—but it really is a fabulous book in its own right. I’ll use the following anecdote to illustrate my point: my freshman-year roommate was a girl with whom I had almost nothing in common—she watched TV shows religiously and hated reading in general; I lived on books and was admittedly pop-culture illiterate. We were certainly an odd couple, but we ended up the best of friends by the end of the year. Our only real crossover as far as books went was The Giver, and one day when we were talking about it, she admitted that she had actually read it not once, but twice (remember, this is the girl who would probably be glad if she never had to pick up another book in her life). I’ve used this story many times to encourage people to read The Giver, and the feedback I get from these recommendations is overwhelmingly positive. I think sometimes people believe that a children’s book cannot possibly be described as “beautiful” (a word that seems reserved for classic literature and mainstream fiction in the public psyche), but I would venture to say that it is just the word to describe this novel.

Summary:

Jonas lives in a perfect world—a utopia in which pain and fear and illness have been banished and where difficult decisions are a thing of the past. Children are assigned at the age of 12 to a role in the community, and Jonas is given the position of “Receiver of Memory.” It is his job to receive the memories of the elderly “Giver”, who is the only member of the community who knows what the world was like before it was perfected; it is this knowledge that will change Jonas’s life—and the way he feels about it—forever.

My twelve-year old sister was recently required to read a Newbery Award-winning book for a school assignment, and asked me for a suggestion. The Giver was at the top of my list, but since another kid in her class was already reading it, she decided she would read something else. However, a couple days later, she came home with The Giver in hand and told me that the boy who had been reading it had picked another book and lent her his copy. She began to read and was absolutely riveted, declining to go out to dinner with the rest of the family in order to stay home and finish it, and afterwards declared it to be “really sad, but really, really good”. I concur. Of course, I don’t want to build up anyone’s expectations into thinking that this is the Holy Grail of YA literature—the book certainly has had its detractors and has been banned countless times for reasons that I would explain, but they would give away some critical plot points (but if you’re really curious, read this USA Today article). Nevertheless, it is well-worth reading.

More banned book reviews to come—for now, happy reading!

Best wishes,

-Madeline

 

“Oh Harry, don’t you see? If she could have done one thing to make absolutely sure that every single person in this school will read your interview, it was banning it!”

-Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, by J.K. Rowling

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