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Posts Tagged ‘madeline’

THE MIDWIFE’S APPRENTICE

by Karen Cushman

Author’s Website: http://www.karencushmanbooks.com/

 

Newbery Medal-winning books are always a good place to look when in search of fabulous historical fiction, and The Midwife’s Apprentice is certainly no disappointment in this respect. Actually, Karen Cushman has written a number of YA historical novels set in Medieval England, but I think this one is probably her finest. A slim volume that weighs in at around 128 pages, this book might easily be written off due to its size; there is, however, no law that a book must be more than 150 pages in order to be funny, thought-provoking, educational, and enjoyable. Which, as it happens, is precisely what The Midwife’s Apprentice is.

Summary:

A nameless girl who knows nothing of the world except hunger, cold, and mistreatment finds herself taking advantage of the heat generated by a dung-heap one cold night, and it is there that she is discovered the next morning by the village midwife, Jane. Called “Beetle” and put to work by the sharp-tempered Jane in exchange for food and shelter, she begins to learn about the art of midwifery (although Jane refuses to teach her anything directly for fear of competition). Little by little, the meek (but intelligent) Beetle carves a place for herself in the world, making friends, learning a trade, and even giving herself a real name—Alyce. But life in Medieval England is full of challenges, and when Alyce encounters one she cannot face, she runs away. Can she muster the courage to face her fears and find what she has finally realized she wants: “a full belly, a contented heart, and a place in this world”?

I first read this book in middle school and was absolutely fascinated by the vivid picture that Ms. Cushman paints. Her Medieval village is dirty, smelly, and completely realistic, flying in the face of the romanticized image of castles and princesses. Even more impressive is the fact that her characters (in spite of the book’s shortness) are fully-fleshed and believable: Brat/Beetle/Alyce is a plucky, gawky, and endearing heroine, and her story is utterly compelling.

This book could easily be read by someone as young as 10, but the intended audience is probably more in the 12-14 age range. Of course, as with all books I recommend, this certainly does not mean readership should be limited to kids and young teens. And, once again, don’t be put off by the book’s length—128 pages is plenty of time for a fascinating story. I highly recommend this book!

Whew, my first November review! With any luck, I’ll find time for another one before the month is out, now that NaNoWriMo is winding down. In the meantime, keep reading, and if you have any suggestions for books you’d like me to review, just leave a comment. Thanks!

Best wishes, and as always, happy reading,

-Madeline

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THE LIGHTNING THIEF

by Rick Riordan

Author’s Website: http://www.rickriordan.com/

 

Some stories are powerful, and others are beautiful and haunting. Still others delight you with their wordplay or their humor, or their daring subject matter. The best part of the Percy Jackson and the Olympians series, however, is the snarky voice of the twelve-year old narrator and the whizzing plot that leaves you breathless and dying to read another chapter. I read this book aloud to my little sister, and both of us had the hardest time finding a good stopping place because the story is just So. Darn. Exciting. If you happen to be looking for a book to get a reluctant reader interested in YA literature, a good read-aloud book, or a “can’t-put-it-down” reading experience for yourself—check it out!

Summary:

Percy Jackson is a “problem child”, and has a history of being kicked out of boarding schools simply because strange, inexplicable things keep happening around him. But even with a history like his, Percy thinks he might finally be going crazy when his math teacher turns into a monster and tries to kill him on a school field-trip. As it turns out, there’s a lot more to the situation than Percy could ever have believed possible; for one thing, the gods of Greek mythology are alive and well and living 600 stories above Manhattan. For another thing, Percy may be the half-mortal son of one of them. Worst of all, Zeus’s most powerful weapon—the Master Bolt—has been stolen, and Percy is the suspected culprit. Now he and his friends have just over a week to prove Percy’s innocence and find the real thief before the gods move from squabbling to all-out war. 

Heros in literature have to have a weakness: Indiana Jones hates snakes, Superman weakens in the presence of kryptonite, etc. Like the best of all heros, Percy Jackson is saddled with a number of disadvantages right from the get-go: he has an awful stepfather who makes his home-life miserable; he struggles with ADHD and dyslexia; he is unmotivated in school and has almost no friends, making the story all that more enjoyable because we get to watch Percy overcome his handicaps and succeed anyways. One quick recommendation, though: a film version of The Lightning Thief is due to be released sometime early next year, and as a firm believer in the aphorism that “The book is always better than the movie,” I strongly suggest that you read this book sooner rather than later. There are a number of things about the trailer that I find disappointing (they changed the age of the characters to about 16, for one thing!), and while it might still end up being an entertaining film, I still think everyone ought to read the book first.

Kids as young as 10 years old could easily read and enjoy this book, but generally, I’d set the age range somewhere between 11 and 15. And as always, I would heartily encourage anyone to read this book to older/adult readers. It’s a rip-roaring story, and who doesn’t enjoy one of those?

Apologies for the delay on this one—I got a bit swamped with other work, but I’ll do my best to catch up and add some more reviews! Until next time…

Best wishes,

-Madeline

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Hello all!

My name is Madeline. For the past four years, I have been volunteering as an “expert” on the free help website AllExperts.com, recommending young adult (YA) books to people based on genres, books, and authors that they have enjoyed in the past. After so many years of doing this, I thought perhaps these same people who write to me could benefit from a more detailed book review than I normally give in my recommendations—hence, the creation of this blog. I’ll be reviewing a wide variety of books here from a number of different genres, and I’ll do my best to group and categorize them in a logical way. Although I may discuss books that have been published recently, I am not planning to discriminate by release date; rest assured that my reviews will not be weighted either in favor of classics or of the bleeding edge of fiction. I’m aiming for a healthy mix of good books, and there’s not much more to it than that. Enjoy!

Best wishes, as always,

-Madeline

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